Disaster Response & Recovery

Oct 01

This year’s Northern California wildfires burned more than 600,000 acres – the largest wildfire in California history. The fires were devastating, resulting in the destruction of numerous structures, the displacement of thousands of residents, and several fatalities. While first responders met the wildfires head-on, volunteers also played an important role, providing comfort and counsel for those at risk of losing everything. CSAA Insurance Group’s award-winning corporate volunteer program, AAA Volunteers, empowers and motivates employees to address diverse community needs through volunteer service. In response to the wildfires, employees volunteered to take time from their normal job duties and daily routines to contact impacted customers.

Sep 20

When natural disasters strike, it can be overwhelming to think about how you can make a difference. For many people, there is a natural desire to do something substantial to help communities in need, but even the most ambitious recovery efforts and good intentions can go wrong in delicate environments. Some families, or even entire communities. lose everything after being hit by a devastating hurricane, super storm, flood, wildfire, landslide or tornado; and we witness the stark reality of the word “disaster “come to life. Instead of donating goods, experts and officials suggest that monetary donations have the greatest potential to address the specific needs of each person impacted by a disaster.

Dec 06

After Hurricanes Irma and Maria left the island of Puerto Rico devastated and millions of resident without power, the Reyes Torres family stepped up to support to their neighbors in the wake of the disaster. Volunteering together as a family, they've helped remove downed trees and trash, and offered general support to members of their community in need.

Nov 07

After spending a chaotic day on a boat rescuing people from Hurricane Harvey floodwaters, Matthew Marchetti set out to see if he could put his data engineering skills to work to find a more organized way to save those affected by the storm damage. He created a platform called CrowdSource Rescue to connect victims with volunteers while local officials and the U.S. Coast Guard were inundated with calls. Within hours of setting up the platform, Matthew received thousands of requests for rescue.

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