Natalye Paquin

Jan 21
Posted by Amanda Knowles to Natalye Paquin, Civic Century

Whether you plug in or tune out, it is hard to avoid the topic of bitterness and division. It is in the headlines, on the nightly news, in our social media feeds and at our family gatherings. Everywhere we look, differences – political, racial, geographical, and otherwise – threaten to divide us. Amidst deep political divisions, heartbreaking displays of hate and intolerance, and a growing distrust of people and institutions, it is critical that we leverage every available opportunity to lift each other up and inspire one another to move beyond this destructive force field.

At the core of our philosophy at Points of Light is a belief that the most powerful force in the world is the individual who has realized their power to do good, and who applies their time, talent, and resources to make a positive difference.

Jun 19
Posted by Amanda Knowles to Natalye Paquin, service unites

When President George H.W. Bush was in office in 1990, and after Nelson Mandela was released from prison, as a young civil rights lawyer living in Chicago reflecting on the need for more light, I wrote a poem. It was a privilege to share this poem last night at the opening plenary session of Service Unites 2018. Many of you have requested a copy of this poem, “How I Read a Poem Like This,” and we are pleased to share it with you, our community of changemakers – points of light in communities around the world, who are helping to ignite a civic culture. Thank you.

Mar 26

In celebration of the diversity of ways in which women lead a civic life, we brought together three nonprofit founders from around the world to share their experiences, talk about their work as part of the Points of Light Network, and offer advice to emerging women leaders who will continue to carry forward our collective mission.

Feb 20
Posted by Amanda Knowles to Natalye Paquin, Civic Culture, Black History Month

Black History Month offers us a time to reflect on the many contributions African-Americans have made to this country and the world. Growing up as the children of hard-working parents in a melting pot community, the school my brother and I went to paused on a variety of special commemorative days to celebrate the rich diversity of all of our cultures and ethnicities. These early experiences and lessons from school have left an indelible imprint on my life, and what I recognize today is that these non-negotiable family values are distinctly connected to the work and service of many historical figures in black history whom we celebrate.

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