Jacqueline Kenyon

Daily Point of Light # 3334 Nov 14, 2006

Jacqueline Kenyon, a senior at Michigan Lutheran High School in St. Joseph, has served for the past five years as ambassador of an annual camp for children with congenital hand differences. "I was born without all my fingers due to what is called Amniotic Band Syndrome," Jacqueline said, "Because I have had many experiences with my hands, I can help those who aren't comfortable with their differences."

At the Hands to Love Congenital Hand Camp in Florida, Jacqueline counsels young campers and their parents, both individually and in groups, answering questions and sharing stories about her own experiences.

She gives advice, helps children with personal struggles caused by their differences, and tries to build each child's self-confidence "by encouraging them to look at their differences as blessings and not a curse."

Jacqueline also urges parents to embrace and encourage their child's differences. In addition, she helps organize activities at the camp, and participates in two benefits each year to raise money for the camp.

"What you do or don't have doesn't matter," she said, "It's the real live person that you are that people will see you for."Jacqueline Kenyon, a senior at Michigan Lutheran High School in St. Joseph, has served for the past five years as ambassador of an annual camp for children with congenital hand differences. "I was born without all my fingers due to what is called Amniotic Band Syndrome," Jacqueline said. "Because I have had many experiences with my hands, I can help those who aren't comfortable with their differences."

At the Hands to Love Congenital Hand Camp in Florida, Jacqueline counsels young campers and their parents, both individually and in groups, answering questions and sharing stories about her own experiences.

She gives advice, helps children with personal struggles caused by their differences, and tries to build each child's self-confidence "by encouraging them to look at their differences as blessings and not a curse."

Jacqueline also urges parents to embrace and encourage their child's differences. In addition, she helps organize activities at the camp, and participates in two benefits each year to raise money for the camp.

"What you do or don't have doesn't matter," she said. "It's the real live person that you are that people will see you for."

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